Silk Acetates the key to a quality textile-on-textile look

Tuesday, July 20, 2010

UPM Raflatac has expanded its product range for textile labelling with three white Silk Acetate faces.

upm raflatac acetate
Suitable for labelling a multitude of textile retail goods, from carpets and fabric to mattresses and shoes, the new Silk Acetate Whites are fold and flex to keep their silky satin looks as an integral part of a quality textile product.
Printable with all conventional printing methods, Silk Acetate Whites are calendared to provide a silky satin finish that lasts. Silk Acetate White Top is a fray-resistant material that provides the cleanest possible die-cut for an enduringly crisp label outline. The topcoat provides an excellent print result with conventional printing methods – especially beneficial for finer multicolour detail. Silk Acetate White TTR adds a good TTR printability for bar codes and other variable information. The heavier gauge also makes it well suited to larger labels where it holds its form and is easily applied by hand.
The three faces are supplied with the RP 38 textile adhesive, and for use on rough textiles, options for permanent adhesives cater for almost all conceivable uses.


For further information, please contact:
Mr Neil Holliday, Director, Business Segments, Film & Special Products, UPM
Raflatac, tel. +33 3 83925415


About UPM Raflatac
UPM Raflatac, part of UPM’s Engineered Materials business group, is one of
the world’s leading suppliers of self-adhesive label materials and the
world’s number one producer of HF and UHF radio frequency identification
(RFID) tags and inlays. UPM Raflatac has a global service network
consisting of 13 factories on five continents and a broad network of sales
offices and slitting and distribution terminals worldwide. UPM Raflatac
employs 2,600 people and made sales of approximately EUR 0.95 billion (USD
1.3 billion) in 2009. Further information is available at
www.upmraflatac.com.

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